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Content : The urban middle class of Maputo. Crucial actor in overcoming the gap between state and society or simple imitator of the elite? (FINAL DOCUMENT)

Author: Johanna BORSCHEIN (Master student in CEAN)

Language of the document: english

Date of production: October 2009

Download Mozambique urban middle class - Final document


Content : Are teachers and their political involvment a good representation of the kenyan middle Classes ? Through an analysis of their strikes since 1997, this document will try to describe the way they relate to the political world, their leaders and labor unions.

Author : Ambra SIMONINI

Country : Kenya

Language : french

Date of production : September 2009

Download Kenya - Syndicalisme enseignant


Content : The urban middle class of Maputo. Crucial actor in overcoming the gap between state and society or simple imitator of the elite? (Termes of reference)

Author: Johanna BORNSCHEIN

Country : Mozambique

Language of the document: english

Date of production: June 2009 (final report : October 2009)

Download Mozambique urban middle class - Term of reference


Content : The “developing world’s middle class” is defined here as those who are not poor when judged by the median poverty line of developing countries, but are still poor by US standards. The “Western middle class” is defined as those who are not poor by US standards. Although barely 80 million people in the developing world entered the Western middle class over 1990-2002, economic growth and distributional shifts allowed an extra 1.2 billion people to join the developing world’s middle class. Four-fifths came from Asia, and half from China. Most of the new entrants remained fairly close to poverty, with incomes now bunched up just above $2 a day. The vulnerability of this new middle class to aggregate economic contractions is evident in the fact that one in six people in the developing world live between $2 and $3 per day. Over time, the developing world has become more sharply divided between countries with a large middle class and those with a relatively small one, with Africa prominent in the latter group. Poor people in countries with smaller middle classes may well be more exposed to slowing economic growth.

Authors: Martin RAVAILLON (World Bank)

Language of the document: english

Date of production: January 2009

Download the Developing World’s Bulging (but Vulnerable) Middle Class

 
 
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